Women's Health Texas – Austin

Dr. Escargaza was drawn to the diversity in ObGyn

Dr. Escargaza talks about the hands-on training she received early in her career and why teaching patients matters to her.

Video Transcript

0:02 – 0.17

I’m from Houston Texas, originally born and raised. I went away to college at Tulane University in New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina actually hit while I was finishing up college. So then I ended up in upstate New York very randomly at an engineering school called Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

 

0:18-0:38

I finished my engineering degree there and realized that engineering really was not for me and I decided that I really had a passion for medicine. So I did a graduate program at University of North Texas in Fort Worth and finished my prereqs from school and got into medical school at Texas Tech in El Paso.

 

0:39-1:02

And that was an incredible experience.  El Paso is a really unique place to be trained and then I ended up back at home in Houston for a residency at Baylor College of Medicine. El Paso was a really interesting place to be trained because it’s a border town and so there are a lot of patients that have really interesting pathology that are coming over from the border to the United States to be treated.

 

1:03 -1:41

And so we saw really advanced cancers, lots of labor and delivery patients. It was very busy so as a medical student I got a lot of hands-on training really early on. What made me really decide that ObGyn was right for me was realizing that there was so much diversity to the practice. So in one day I could be seeing a teenager talking to her about birth control and safe sex practices and then running over to labor and delivery and delivering a baby to a brand-new family and then in the same day being back at clinic and speaking to a woman about her menopausal symptoms and then maybe the very next day doing a hysterectomy in the operating room.

 

1:42 – 2:14

And so I really liked that there was a lot of diversity to the practice. Early on I realized that I had a really true love for laparoscopic surgery and I think the very first hysterectomy I did was a defining moment to me that made me realize this was a really cool specialty and was really where I was supposed to be. We had a woman that had come in from another country in Africa and she was severely anemic and had a huge uterus she looked pregnant but was you know fifty years old and just had this huge fibroid uterus.

 

2:15 – 2:36

We ended up having to do a pretty emergent hysterectomy to get her bleeding to stop and I just remember you know doing the surgery and thinking this is incredible. I can’t believe that we’re taking this woman’s uterus and she’s no longer gonna have any bleeding and we’re really fixing her and I think that was really an incredible moment to help her.

 

2:37 – 3:04

My philosophy in patient care is really to work with patients on teaching. I really think that if I hadn’t gone into medicine I would have really enjoyed being a teacher. Teaching and learning the process of what’s going on helps patients feel really involved and like empowered that they’re in control of their own healthcare.